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Libellago hyalina, Selys, 1859

Family: Chlorocyphidae (Jewels)
Scientific Name: Libellago hyalina
Common Name: Clearwing Gem

July is definitely the breeding month for the Clearwing gems where I have seen many of these little gems scattering around an open patch of the forest in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve. This time round, males are evidently more abundant than females.

Majority of the males are matured male which has a bluish grey abdomen. Younger male has attractive steel blue abdomen.

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This is an adult matured male. The abdomen is bluish grey in colour.
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Another matured male.
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Third male with the same colouration. This is the most common colour form.
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Adult male with amazing steel blue abdomen.

Females has a thicker abdomen and stouter in appearance. Young female has a golden orange body whilst older females are paler bluish grey in colour.

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Young female has a orange-striped abdomen. The pterostigma is white in colour.
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Another young female.
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Older female has a dull bluish abdomen.
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Libellago lineata (Burmeister, 1839) – Golden Gem

Family: Chlorocyphidae (Jewels)
Scientific Name: Libellago lineata
Common Name: Golden Gem

Golden Gem is a very attractive damselfly and is locally rare in Singapore. The male has extensive golden-yellow markings on the thorax and abdominal segments. It has dark iridescence spot on the tip of the forewing. It also has white legs which it displays during fighting with rival males. The female is slightly bigger and more robust.

This species can be found in just two to three locations in Singapore. It has been found at a large sandy-bottom stream in the western part of Singapore and at a remote corner of the reservoir in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve. It has also been seen at a stream inside the forest of the MacRitchie Reservoir.

These are sub-adult males which has yet to develop the shade of golden colour of the adult males.

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Sub-adult male.
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Eyes are dull. The dark apical spot has yet to develop.
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Same male.

Adult males display their full glory and are always ready to fight for territories and to mate with the females.

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Adult male.
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Adult male defending it’s territories on a rock.
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He is ready to pick up a fight with other males.
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At another perch near the river edge.
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Back again!!

These are sub-adult females. They are stouter with thicker abdomen.

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Very similar to sub-adult males but larger in size.
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It has abit of golden yellow on it’s abdomen.

Fully-grown females are greenish with black markings. They often hide in the corners and away from the breeding spots. They only appear at the right time for mating.

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In the thicker vegetation.
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Another adult female.

A shot video of adult males engage in territories fight.

Libellago hyalina, Selys, 1859 – Female

Family: Chlorocyphidae (Jewels)
Scientific Name: Libellago hyalina
Common Name: Clearwing Gem

The female of Libellago hyalina is as attractive as the male, in my opinion. The abdomen of the female has two colour form, a striking golden-orange coloured form and the dark grey coloured form.

This species usually appear in late morning, perching lowly on grass or twigs. They seem to be very active in the late morning to noon.

The abdomen of the young female is golden-orange in colour.

This is another coloured form, dark grey.

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Libellago hyalina, Selys, 1859 – Male

Family: Chlorocyphidae (Jewels)
Scientific Name: Libellago hyalina
Common Name: Clearwing Gem

Clearwing Gem is truely the flying jewels in the forests of our nature reserve. Although widespread in the Sundaland, they are rare in Singapore and can only be found at the Central Catchment Nature Reserve. This species inhibit slow flowing forest streams as well as swampy areas in the nature reserves, where both males and females prefer to perch lowly on twigs and leaves in the open areas near to streams or swamp.

Males are brightly coloured and the colour of their abdomen can range from glowing purple, to steel blue, to bluish grey when they matured. Females are slightly more common than males and they also have striking colours from bright orange to bluish grey.

Libellago hyalina is the third and last species of Chlorocyphidae (Jewels) that is still surviving in Singapore, (the fourth species, Libellago stigmatizans is extinct). All Libellago species of Singapore should be protected.

This is the glowing purple abdomen form when male is at the young adult stage

As the male matures, the abdomen slowing change to steel blue form

At adult stage, the abdomen is bluish grey in colour

Libellago lineata Burmeister, 1839

Family: Chlorocyphidae (Jewels)
Scientific Name: Libellago lineata
Common Name: Golden Gem

Golden Gem is one of the most attractive damselfly that can be found in Singapore. It is rare and can only be found at two locations, Mandai Stream and Central Catchment Nature Reserve. The male has an attractive golden-yellow markings on the 5-6 abdominal segments.  It also has a dark apical spot on the forewing. Young males will defend territories around fallen tree trunk, floating leaves, or twigs. Female is rather rare and has more extensive pale yellowish markings on the thorax and abdomen.

Male like to perch on emergent water plants, floating leaves, twigs etc and defend it's territories.
Male like to perch on emergent water plants, floating leaves, twigs etc and defend it’s territories.
This male is resting on a fallen leave on the side of a running stream, under the shade of surrounding vegetation.
This male is resting on a fallen leave on the side of a running stream, under the shade of surrounding vegetation.
Female on twig
Female on twig
Males fighting for territories
Males fighting for territories
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Libellago aurantiaca Selys, 1859

Family: Chlorocyphidae (Jewels)
Scientific Name: Libellago aurantiaca
Common Name: Fiery Gem

This brilliantly coloured damselfly is unmistakeable. In the book “Dragonflies of Singapore”, it mentioned this is an uncommon species but I would think it is a relatively rare species, compared to Libellago lineata  and Libellago hyalina. It can only be found at the Central Catchment Nature Reserve. The habitat for this species is clear, flowing forest streams with sandy bottom. Male is often seen perching on twig, water plants or floating leaves flowing down the streams. So far, I have not seen female of this species yet.

Male perching on floating plant on fast flowing stream in the swamp forest
Resting on water plant
Resting on water plant
perching on twig above forest stream
perching on twig above forest stream